@maddiemcgarvey

Maddie McGarvey

Photographic wanderings- Columbus, Ohio and beyond 🌻 💌:maddiemcgarvey@gmail.com 

http://www.maddiemcgarvey.com/

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Oklahoma Kids // Praise Jesus Christ. I spotted these kids playing in giant piles of dirt with toy guns on the border of Oklahoma and Texas. They talked about video games and asked if I’d ever met anyone famous. I showed them some of my photos and they lost interest and started shooting each other again. Photographed while exploring the West for @nytimes.  Scroll ➡️

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I met a woman with the most amazing silver hair while traveling through Oklahoma on my road trip out West. It’s both nerve wracking and totally exciting driving with almost no real plans and seeing who you meet and what you find. For @nytimes.  Swipe ➡️

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Kamiya, age 7, in Carnegie, Oklahoma. - I went on an impromptu road trip from Oklahoma to New Mexico recently with the goal of illustrating essays about power for @nytimes.  I met Kamiya in my travels and loved her confidence. I’ll post more from my trip soon ✨✨ scroll ➡️

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Senator Elizabeth Warren on the campaign trail for @Slate.  ***** “After the heartbreak of 2016, Elizabeth Warren is giving women new reasons to hope.” At the Fairfax campaign stop, Warren tells some thousand people who have shown up to hear her, a crowd visibly dominated by women, that her lifelong dream was to be a teacher—a dream she lived up to as a special education teacher and a law professor before becoming a United States senator and, now, a candidate for president. This is something some of the Warren think pieces tend to miss: Warren is an extraordinary educator. We misread her as a detached wonk when she’s actually a brilliant translator of complex ideas. Watching her on the stump, you come to realize that it’s not so much the fact that she knows a lot of technical and complicated things that truly excites her fans, it’s that she can explain them to you. Women are often told they react emotionally to candidates, while men are meant to admire and appreciate complex policy. Warren is disrupting that paradigm." Words by Dahlia Lithwick. Swipe ➡️➡️➡️➡️

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  • 1 month ago

I was surprised to see my photo on the front page of @nytimes  today on a story I worked on in Pittsburgh last week. “The nuance in how Americans view abortion has largely fallen out of the noisy national dialogue about when women should be able to end their pregnancies. Complex questions — of medicine, morality, personal empowerment and the proper role of government — are often reduced to the kind of all-or-nothing propositions that are ever more common in the polarized politics of the Trump era. Democrats running for president today often characterize abortion rights as absolute. And they steer clear of saying what polls have repeatedly shown about Americans’ views since Roe v. Wade made abortion a constitutionally protected right in 1973: It’s complicated. There are still some opponents of abortion barely hanging on as Democrats. “I’m really sad because I don’t want to be a Republican,” said Jeannie Wallace French of Pittsburgh, who has worked with groups like Feminists for Life, which oppose abortion but are less partisan than many mainstream groups. She was pregnant with twins when she said the doctors discovered one had a form of spina bifida and advised her to abort. She declined and the baby, a girl, died shortly after birth. But doctors were able to use her heart valves to save two other infants. She worries that stories like hers are getting drowned out. “It has become so loud, going both ways,’’ she said. “And the divide is only getting bigger.” In Pittsburgh, Aimee Murphy founded a group called Rehumanize International that hold many positions embraced by progressives: opposing racial discrimination, capital punishment, torture and drone strikes, for instance. But because it also opposes abortion, she said, it has been marginalized in progressive circles. “In mainstream feminist circles, the word pro-life is like a swear word,” she said.” Story by Jeremy Peters. Swipe ➡️➡️➡️ thank you to @heather_casey  for the assignment! 🙏🏼🙌🏻

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Before her surgery last year, Aminata Welcome, 33, who immigrated from Niger, talked with her preteen daughter, showing her drawings from a medical website. “I explained to her, ‘This is what a woman’s private part looks like versus someone who went through cutting, mutilation,” Ms. Welcome recalled. “‘As a baby, this happened to me. I’m missing this part. Yours is like this; Mommy’s looks like that.’” Ms. Welcome, a Philadelphia bus driver who regularly works nights, assured her that “medicine has come up with solutions, and I am getting fixed.” “Are you going to be O.K.?” her daughter asked. “Yes,” Ms. Welcome replied, “Mommy’s going to be O.K.” The morning of her operation, dressed in a black-and-gold abaya, she swept the air with orange-polished fingernails as she described how American men she dated after her divorce dumped her when they learned she had been cut. “I’ve been rejected three times because of it,” she said. Heading to the surgery center, Ms. Welcome said, “I’m realistic that it’s never going to be like it never was cut away from me.” She shielded her eyes, praying silently. “This surgery is going to make me feel more like a woman.” After two hours in recovery, Ms. Welcome was discharged. Exhausted, she rested on a green velour sofa at home. “This is something I’ve been looking for — for the longest,” she said, her voice soft but strengthening. “And here I am.” **** Over 200 million women and girls alive have experienced Female Genital Mutilation. I am so incredibly grateful for the three who opened up their lives and allowed Pam Belluck and I to witness their journey to feel whole. For @nytimes  - Swipe ➡️➡️➡️

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Marian Gbaya, now 27, initially accepted what she was told as a girl in Sierra Leone: that if her clitoris was not severed, she might become sexually promiscuous and men would think “you’re walking around with the dirty stuff that needs to be cut.” But at 20, soon after joining her mother and sisters in Columbus, Ohio, she began seeing things differently. At a Job Corps program, she heard young women discussing sex, mentioning the clitoris. “How come you still have that?” Ms. Gbaya says she wondered, keeping quiet because she had been told in Sierra Leone that if she disclosed her cutting “you will die.” Men she dated, she said, reacted harshly to her anatomy: “Can’t deal with that. I’m gone.” Her solution was to avoid sex. But while studying cosmetology and training in weight lifting, she increasingly felt her body was not whole. “I do beauty, I’m trying to be a body builder,” she said. “I cannot do that if I’m walking around with an insecurity.” Describing a 2017 consultation with Ms. Gbaya, Dr. Percec said: “I remember her specifically saying, ‘I don’t care if I lose pleasure. I just want to look normal.’” Over 200 million women and girls alive today have experiences Female Genital Mutilation. Pam Belluck and I spent time with three brave women who shared their pain, emotional trauma and sexual struggles — and their journey to feel whole. For @nytimes.  Swipe ➡️➡️➡️

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She called it her “deepest, darkest secret,” one she had never even shared with her husband. When Saffiatu Sillah was growing up in the West African nation of Sierra Leone, her clitoris was cut off in a ritual circumcision. She was left with scar tissue that caused pain during sex and agony during childbirth. After her second child was born, Ms. Sillah, a pharmacist then living in Philadelphia, searched for medical help. Dr. Ivona Percec, a plastic surgeon at the University of Pennsylvania, said she thought an operation could ease the pain but might fail to uncover any remnant of the clitoris beneath the scarring. More than 200 million women and girls alive today have undergone genital cutting in 30 countries in Africa, the Middle East and Asia, ranging from nicks to extreme damage. Yet despite the extraordinary need for appropriate medical care, there has been little rigorous research on how surgeons can relieve enduring physical harm or improve sexual sensation. With Ms. Sillah’s operation in 2016, Dr. Percec joined a small but growing number of doctors worldwide performing such surgeries. For Ms. Sillah, the trauma of circumcision began at age 7, when she was blindfolded and cut, causing “the most excruciating pain.” She was told, “This is what makes you a woman.” As her wound healed, her labia fused together, leaving a narrow opening. After joining her mother in New Jersey at 16, she held off on dating, fearing men would be appalled. When she finally had sex, she said, “it was so painful.” Two grueling childbirths drove her to seek surgery. After she awoke from surgery, Dr. Percec announced remarkable news: “I found your clitoris!” Ms. Sillah said she felt complete as a woman for the first time. “Like wow — I actually have a clitoris sitting there,” said Ms. Sillah, who now lives in Maryland. “I always had an orgasm but, oh my gosh, it’s so much better.” Pam Belluck and I spent time with 4 extremely brave women who shared their stories with us for @nytimes.  I flew to Philly to photograph them at home, with their families, and was even able to witness this incredible surgery. I’ll be sharing each of their stories here in the coming days. Swipe ➡️➡️➡️

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I photographed Rick Marsh, who recently lost his job when the Lordstown GM plant closed, for @nytimes.  For three generations of Marsh men, the G.M. plant was a golden ticket to a middle-class life in a part of the country where those were not easy to come by. Then, when Rick Marsh got the biggest test of his life — the birth of his beloved daughter, Abigail, and her diagnosis of cerebral palsy at the age of one — his job became a central part of how he saw himself. He was her provider, her protector. That was his worth in the world. So when the last car rolled off the Lordstown assembly line around 2:45 p.m. on Wednesday, March 6, it was like a heart stopping. He had lost the thing that made him who he was. Now Mr. Marsh faces a choice. He can stay in Lordstown for as long as there is a chance the plant might restart production. If it does close for good, he can hope his seniority will be enough to land a job at another G.M. plant. Or he could transfer to another G.M. plant sooner, but he hates that idea. His biggest worry is for his daughter, Abby, now 14. He and his wife have spent years fighting to get her services in Ohio, aides in school and coverage under Medicaid. Moving would be wrenching. He feels angry that a company can just do this — blow out of town after highway exit ramps were built for it and the government bailed it out, and meanwhile announce that the new Chevy Blazer will be made in Mexico. He never used to care that G.M.’s chief executive, Mary Barra, made millions of dollars every year. Now he thinks about it. Companies have more and more power. It makes him feel small. Like the time they were told they’d be laid off, and everybody just went right back to work. “It felt like we were begging,” he said. “It’s humiliating, as a man, as a person, as a worker.” “People are going to get hungry, and when I mean hungry, I don’t mean just for food,” he said. “I think, once you get pushed to a point that you have nothing left,” he said, and paused. “Without the ability to feed my family and pay for my children and feed my children, what am I as a man?” A must read by Sabrina Tavernise. Swipe ➡️➡️➡️ thanks so much to @crista.chapman  for the trust!

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For the first five months of Morgan Lyles’ high-risk pregnancy with twins, her fiancé Chris Weien was by her side. They’d purchased car seats for their SUVs and confirmed that Lyles would take maternity leave from her job as an attorney for the state of Ohio. But when Weien suffered a series of seizures that sent him to the ICU when Lyles was 20 weeks pregnant, Lyles couldn’t afford to be there with him. She had only four weeks of paid family leave—at 70% of her salary—and was terrified of dipping into her paid vacation and sick time, knowing the twins would need her later. “I’ve got to save what leave I can,” she recalls telling a colleague who was shocked to see her in the office while her fiancé was in the hospital. It still wasn’t enough. Maura and Lena were born on March 2, about two months after their dad was discharged. They were just over 3 lb. each, and both suffered from a minor brain bleed. Lyles exhausted her allotted paid maternity leave before the girls even came home in April. Though anxious about the coming deluge of medical bills, Lyles has little choice but to use unpaid leave now too. The U.S. is the only industrialized nation that doesn’t guarantee paid parental leave through a federal law. If an attorney like Lyles can’t cobble together enough paid time off to be with her sick fiancé and care for her babies, the challenges can be even starker for the 83% of civilian workers without any paid family leave at all. “We have every incidence of privilege, and it’s still incredibly hard,” Lyles says. “I have no idea what people who aren’t similarly situated do. I can’t even imagine.” Photographed for @time.  Thanks so much to @katattack42  For the opportunity. Swipe ➡️➡️➡️

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I spent a day in Iowa last month for @nytimes  with Presidential candidate Kirsten Gillibrand (current senator from New York.) Being in Iowa was fascinating to me. Geographically, it’s so similar to Ohio. But at a restaurant, someone said to me “you can’t swing a dead cat without hitting a Presidential candidate in Iowa.” Many expressed how lucky they felt to be able to listen to so many different platforms and “shop around” for candidates. I followed Gillibrand to many quaint diners and coffee shops around the state. I always enjoy watching the periphery in politics— you can tell a lot about a candidate from the people who show up. From the story by @asteadwesley  “Asked if a Woman Can Win, 2020 Candidates Offer an Easy Answer: ‘I Have.’” Senator Kirsten Gillibrand of New York had a request: Before anyone mocked her claim that she was the Democratic presidential candidate best positioned to take on President Trump, at least listen to the evidence. Ms. Gillibrand won her first House race in an upstate conservative district that had “more cows than Democrats,” as she likes to say. She ran on Medicaid expansion as early as 2006, long before it had become a litmus test for the progressive flank of the Democratic Party, which often derides her as inauthentic. In her 2018 Senate re-election campaign, she flipped 18 counties that had voted for Mr. Trump just two years earlier, and in 2012 she received a higher share of the vote in New York than any statewide candidate before or since — better than Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo, better than former Senator Hillary Clinton, better than former President Barack Obama. Ms. Gillibrand specifically alluded to Mr. Buttigieg and Mr. O’Rourke, saying, “I don’t think either of them have won red and purple areas. I have.” Ms. Warren, Ms. Gillibrand, Ms. Harris and Ms. Klobuchar can all claim an interesting distinction: They have never lost an election in their political careers. All of the most prominent male Democratic candidates, including Mr. Biden, Mr. Buttigieg, Mr. O’Rourke, Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont and Senator Cory Booker of New Jersey, have lost at least one. Thanks as always to @tannercurtis  for the assignment! Swipe ➡️➡️➡️

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Joe Biden in Pittsburgh yesterday at his first public rally since announcing his candidacy for President for @nytimes.  Photographing politics is funny. Sometimes you have all the room in the world to move around, get close to the candidates, and shoot in beautiful light. Other times you are crammed on a 4 foot long riser in a dark room with 10 other photographers, sick as a dog, and hoping you are in the right place when the action happens. It can definitely be a challenge but is a fun way to try to see a little different. I feel lucky to get to experience all of it up close and first hand. Thanks @tannercurtis  as always for the trust. Swipe ➡️➡️➡️

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I followed @berniesanders  around Ohio and Pennsylvania earlier this week for @nytimes.  Hard to believe campaigning for 2020 has already begun! Thanks as always to @tannercurtis  ✨✨ swipe ➡️➡️ to see photos from Lordstown and Pittsburgh

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I photographed the @kingjames  I Promise School in Akron, OH this week for @nytimes.  This time last year, the students at the school - Lebron James’s biggest foray into educational philanthropy - were identified as the worst performers in the Akron public schools and branded with behavioral problems. Some as young as 8 were considered at risk of not graduating. Now, they are helping close the achievement gap in Akron. The academic results are early, and at 240, the sample size of students is small, but the inaugural classes of third and fourth graders at I Promise posted extraordinary results in their first set of district assessments. Ninety percent met or exceeded individual growth goals in reading and math, outpacing their peers across the district. The school has a fully stocked food pantry for families whenever they need it, as well as classes for parents to receive their GED. Unlike other schools connected to celebrities, I Promise is not a charter school run by a private operator but a public school operated by the district. Its population is 60 percent black, 15 percent English-language learners and 29 percent special education students. Three-quarters of its families meet the low-income threshold to receive services. “These were the children where you went and talked with their old teachers, and they said, ‘This will never work,’” Dr. Campbell said. “We said give them to us.” They are called the “Chosen Ones,” an ode to the headline that donned Mr. James’s first Sports Illustrated cover when he was a junior in high school, and which he later had tattooed across his shoulder blades. The school’s culture is built on “Habits of Promise” — perseverance, perpetual learning, problem solving, partnering and perspective — that every student commits to memory. The slogan “We Are Family” is emblazoned on walls and T-shirts. Nataylia Henry, a fourth grader, missed more than 50 days of school last year because she said she would rather sleep than face bullies at school. This year, her overall attendance rate is 80 percent. “LeBron made this school,” she said. “It’s an important school. It means that you can always depend on someone.” Swipe ➡️➡️➡️

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I photographed Edith Espinal and Miriam Vargas recently for @newrepublic.  Espinal has spent 18 months hiding from ICE in a church, and is one of about 50 people currently living in public sanctuary in the United States. Her security at Columbus Mennonite is based largely on the assumption that ICE officers won’t enter a church building. The number of people seeking public sanctuary increased significantly after President Donald Trump’s inauguration. Through a series of executive actions, Trump has bolstered the power of ICE and limited legal options for undocumented immigrants like Espinal, who has no criminal record, has lived in the country for two decades, and has raised a family here. “Now this is my life,” she said from the church. “It’s very difficult to live in sanctuary because you feel very depressed, the first months, the first days,” said Espinal. “You don’t know exactly what’s going on.” Espinal cannot leave the church, for fear of being deported. In June, one of her sons landed in the emergency room for appendicitis, and in September, he was injured in a car accident. Both times, Espinal was unable to be with him in the hospital. Miriam Vargas and her two young daughters are living in a church across town. Vargas, who grew up in Honduras and came to the United States in 2005, is undocumented. She was first picked up by ICE officers in 2013, but was released because she was six months pregnant with her second daughter. In 2018, she was given a final deportation order. “The goal of the new sanctuary movement is twofold: to stop such deportations, and to bear witness to a system so broken and inhumane that it is driving people to live in churches. If ICE officers begin bursting into churches, the contemporary sanctuary movement could start to resemble the Civil Rights Movement, where it took violent state response to nonviolent resistance for white American lawmakers to begin changing policy.” *This post is dedicated to Rubén Castilla Herrera, pictured in the last photo, who passed away unexpectedly this week. He was the passionate leader of the Columbus Sanctuary Collective, and a giant advocate for both women. Thank you for your kindness. Swipe ➡️

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I photographed Belle Shefrin in Cleveland recently for a @nytimes  section that followed up with young teens captured in photographs on the front lines of politics during the 2016 election, and how the Trump era is molding the next generation of voters. @heislerphoto  captured Belle in the front row of a Clinton rally in Akron in 2016. She waited for hours to be in the front row, and had her figurine of Hillary Clinton signed by the Presidential hopeful. She was even invited to the White House to meet the Obama's after the rally. “I believe very much in equal rights and I believe everyone deserves to be able to vote and to have jobs and to have all the same opportunities.” It was cool to see a young woman care so much about the world around her at such a young age. Swipe ➡️➡️➡️ for photos (the last one is Todd's image of her from that rally)

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I photographed Ansly Damus in Cleveland recently for @motherjonesmag.  In Haiti, Damus had taught ethics at a professional school and math and physics to middle schoolers but said he fled in 2014 after a local gang beat him for criticizing a corrupt politician. When he started his journey to America, he imagined that upon arriving at the border, he would spend three days in government custody before being released. Instead, he was sent to a county jail in Ohio, a state he had no connection to or intention to visit, for two years. Damus languished in the jail, a mild-mannered former teacher among criminals, for three months, then six. For one year, then two. All the while, he was never allowed to step outside for recreation. Criminals in the jail were sometimes allowed to leave for work, but Damus, as an ICE detainee, was not. He was humiliated, ashamed, and cut off from his wife and two young children in Haiti. Damus compared his experience to showing up at someone’s home and asking for help. America let him in and then treated him like a robber, he said. All across the country were people like Damus who’d followed the legal procedures to seek asylum and ended up isolated in jail cells in places where they’d never planned to be. “I have not been outside for more than a year,” Damus said. “I have not even glimpsed natural light. I have not breathed fresh air or felt the sun on my face, and I never know if it is cold or hot outside, if the sun is out, and if the seasons are changing.” 768 days after he was first detained, Damus walked out of the Cleveland ICE office as a free man. The government told the ACLU it was willing to settle if Damus agreed to wear an ankle monitor and live with his sponsors, Melody Hart and Gary Benjamin. Now that he is out of detention, his case will likely be a lower priority for the Board of Immigration Appeals. Hart and Benjamin have been told to be prepared to have Damus living with them for two years. The Board of Immigration Appeals has ruled against him twice, and there is reason to believe it will do so again. Thanks as always to @ickibod  for the edit and trust. Story by Noah Lanard. Swipe ➡️➡️➡️

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Frankie Norris of Albany, Kentucky, was 47 when he began driving bulldozers, track-hoes, and fuel trucks at the site of the coal ash spill. After six months he began having trouble using the bathroom. His blood pressure spiked, and he got burning sores on his skin. After four years he was laid off for his illnesses. In 2016 his colon ruptured, sending him into the ICU for 19 days, where he almost died. "Was it dusty? Lord yes," says Norris. "Every time those air brakes went off it'd blow dust in your face. I was in dust constantly for 10 to 12 hours a day. I went up with some other guys and we asked for dust masks. They told us there wouldn't be no dust masks. Safety guy told us we'd get fired for even asking for one.” Norris says he thought about quitting, but he had a wife and three kids to support. It was the depths of the recession, and the cleanup jobs paid more than $20 an hour. There were men standing in line for them. "I needed the work," Norris said. "I wanted to get my kids through school. But I didn't expect TVA to kill us.” For Jeff Brewer, 44, of New Market, Tennessee, he and his coal-ash coworkers were little more than expendable guinea pigs. He started working on the Kingston cleanup as a healthy man in his mid-30s, and after four years in the pit he was on two blood-pressure pills, a fluid pill, and a steroid inhaler; he was getting a testosterone shot every two weeks. He's been diagnosed with liver dysfunction and obstructive lung disease. Every few minutes he's racked by a harsh barking cough. "It was like sucking the life out of you," Brewer says. "If I knew what I know today, I'd have picked up cans on the side of the road. But I had a wife and three girls and I needed to provide for them. And they told us it wouldn't hurt us. You could eat a pound of it every day.” While photographing Tommy Johnson, we had to stop many times while he broke out into violent coughing spells, struggling to breathe. His wife would fetch his inhaler and some water and he’d take long puffs of it with tears in his eyes. It’s like this every day, he says. For @NatGeo.  Story by Joel Bourne, editing by @samanthabrandyclark.  Swipe ➡️➡️➡️ for photos

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